At The Home of Craft, we have over 120 years of pattern heritage across our iconic brands.

We are truly excited to be launching our archive on line, allowing you to browse and buy our vintage knitting and crochet designs.

Dive into the 50s and 60s to start with. We have 7 decades represented in our extensive collection of archive patterns so there will soon be something for everyone!

Over 70 years of archive patterns

50’s & 60’s Available now

The 1950's

Our 1950s archive has classic vintage designs for men, women and children from our Wendy and Robin ranges. Patterns for figure hugging sweaters and knitted lingerie for the ladies sit alongside traditional socks and tank tops for the men. Ladies fashion in the 1950s was a time of pretty decorations and cute appliques for sweaters which now fitted a little tighter, creating a generation of “sweater girls.” The term sweater girl started in the 1940s with movie star icon Lana Turner. She and other young women, wearing snug fitting sweater tops were seen as both innocent and sexy. Brighter colours and the introduction of man-made fibres saw the variety of design options skyrocket.

4

Heritage brands

7

Decades soon to be available online

10,000+

Archive patterns

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50’s & 60’s Available now

Over 70 years of archive patterns

The 1960's

Our 1960s archive sees the introduction of Peter Pan as a boutique brand created for babies and toddlers. These infant patterns sit alongside patterns featuring fashion icon Mary Quant. By the 1960s, all things fancy and fitted were out replaced by a simple boxy style with a handmade look reflecting the new street culture. Knitwear was divided into two fashion demographics. The first was for women who still embraced the 1950s with its regal look and clean lines influenced by women, like Jackie O’, who wore garments that fit the new boxy silhouette yet had a clean couture look. The second demographic was the youth of the 60s. They developed their own trends and were not afraid of big patterns and bold, bright, clashing colours. Quirky designs and a playful attitude to fashion would push boundaries as the decade progressed.

Subscribe to our mailing list to receive your free pattern and keep up to date with our latest news, events and exclusive product launches.